Friday, January 14, 2011

Wildflowers

Donkey orchid

It was springtime when we inspected the property. There were so many flowers to surprise and delight us. Who could not fall in love with the orchids, pea flowers, flax lilies, rice flowers, bluebells, daisies and others with more complicated names I'm still to figure out.

5 comments:

  1. Ah, now I looked at this post this morning, and just remembered what I wanted to ask.

    Surely, 'Donkey Orchid' is a common name. Is this a native orchid? Donkeys are not native to Australia, are they?

    This is a most perplexing name. They do not have a donkey colouring. Maybe they make a similar noise?

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  2. Well I should have googled first:
    'Diuris are called 'Donkey Orchids' because of their prominent petals, which protrude from the top of the flower like a donkey's ears. The name, Diuris, meaning 'double tailed', describes the narrow, lateral sepals which extend down, under the labelum (lip) for some distance and are often crossed. These two features give Diuris their unique appearance and make them easily distinguished from other species of orchids.'

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  3. Yeh that's right you saved me the trouble of explaining. They are native and the first time I've ever seen them but now I've found my Blue Mountains Wildflower Book (in the big spring clean and on the shelf and on the shelf where it was supposed to be all along) I find them called Spotted Double Tails and they are apparently common in sandy soil of open forest.

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  4. "Spotted Double Tails"!! Splutter ... what committee came up with that little gem?

    Suddenly 'Donkey Orchid' is most appealing ...

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  5. These orchids are awesome! I believe I have never seen them.

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